Will drilling near Japan be the first stage towards an earthquake early warning system?

Geologists are investigating the Nankai Trough, off Japan, in an attempt to beeter understand it’s geology and perhaps develop an early warning system for earthquakes:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/7353866.stm

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Welcome to the Anthropocene epoch!

For a long time, geologists have wondered what trace the human race would leave in the geological record. The period is now being called the Anthropocene:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/7223663.stm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthropocene

Did Elephants evolve from an aquatic ancestor?

It has been suggested that elephants evolved from water-loving ancestors, similar in lifestyle to modern hippos:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/7347284.stm

Ancient volcanoes in Antarctica

Was Antarctica the home to major volcanic eruptions in the past?

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/7194579.stm

Is the Burgess Shale the most important fossil locality in the world?

The Burgess Shale, in British Columbia, Canada, is famous for its preservation of soft bodied fossils from the Cambrian Period, when multicellular life was relatively new. It preserves an number of creatures which can be recognised as ancestors of our current biota as well as many other forms which were not successful in evolutionary terms.

You can find out much more about at this link, which contains a variety of links to more detailed pages:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burgess_Shale

Ancient spider revealed in amber

A 40 million year old spider has been dicovered by an amateur collector and donated to the Natural History Museum in London:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/7327038.stm

Previous amber finds have uncovered much about the evolution of spiders:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/5075860.stm